There is an important law which has probably effected us all at some point.   It’s called the Working Time Directive and it limits the amount of time any employee can work in a single week.
As part of this legislation there are several specific sections which refer to certain types of job.  For example there are two directives on working time that can impact drivers who spend a lot of time at the wheel.  The first is the horizontal directive, which employed under the Working Time Regulations 2003 August 2003 in the uk on 1 affects everybody in the transportation sector. The provisions under this directive will impact non workers in the road transportation sector. Workers affect. The next directive, usually referred to as that the Road transportation directive 3820\/. The United Kingdom has implemented this from 23 March 2005, however when the country leaves the European Union there will possibly be some alterations. Under this amending directive employees are permitted to opt out from the 48 hour average working week. Mobile workers are eligible for health checks and annual leave.

Most of these are of course only applicable to traditional employers who work in the private or public sector.  All over Europe now there are many millions of people who work for themselves in a self employed capacity.     There are of course millions of people who work from home, perhaps working remotely through a VPN like this who should be covered by the legislation but in reality have little protection.

Working Time Directive

Guidance on the application of the working time regulations, as amended can be obtained from the number or can be found online at both European and Government legislation web sites, To health checks demand and the leave of the Horizontal Amendment Directive, The Road Transport Directive presents security for workers. March 2005 workers in the range will be covered by 23 March 2009, and self should be addressed by 23. Weekly Working time is limited to an average 48 hour week and a 60 hours. There’s no opt out for people wishing to work longer than an average 48 hour week, but break periods of availability don’t count as working time.

Periods of availability include accompanying a vehicle on a ferry crossing and waiting for a vehicle to be loaded \/ unloaded. Drivers need to be informed in advance about these periods, and their approximate length. For mobile employees driving in a team, it includes period spent sitting next to the driver whilst the vehicle is moving. Night employees are restricted to 10 hours work in each 24 hour period. There are some derogations which are effectively exemptions for individual Member States under that the Road Transport Directive. Under certain circumstances, derogations may be permitted in that the 10 hour daily limit for night work, and increase that the reference period for that the 48 hour average week may also be increased from 4 to six months. There’s no derogation in the 60 hour maximum week for any member nation.

Additional references:

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